Honda HR-V Review

Honda HR-V Review

Suggested HR-V MSRP

$20,820 SHOP

Average HR-V Used Price

$16,950 SEARCH

SUVS.com Review Score

Good SUV Review Ranking    76/100

Honda HR-V Stats

MPG

SUV MPG Reivew
25 City
31 Highway

Horsepower

SUV Horsepower Reivew
141 HP
127 Torque

0-60 Time

SUV 0 to 60 Reivew
8.6 Seconds
N/A to 100mph

Drivetrain

SUV Drivetrain Review
front wheel drive


Overview

While technically subcompact in size and also the smallest SUV in Honda’s lineup, the HR-V feels far from cramped! Its interior is surprisingly spacious, offering ample cargo room! There are also multiple cargo modes, thanks to its second-row “Magic Seat.”

SUVs.com had the chance to test drive an HR-V Sport. What’s nice with the Sport trim is that for an affordable price, you get a ton of style! It features a black honeycomb grille and also larger 18” wheels with a fun, sporty design. There’s also sport side sills.

Other unique touches for the HR-V include special rear door handles that are located directly behind the rear windows. You might miss them at first and mistakingly think the HR-V is a two-door crossover! It feels good to open the doors that way, and it helps the vehicle look clean and be more aerodynamic.

There are a number of different trim options for the Honda HR-V and all feature the same engine. They also all offer optional all-wheel drive. The range-topping Touring trim features all-wheel drive as standard, though.

The trims offered are LX, Sport, EX, EX-L, and Touring. What’s notable with the HR-V is that you can’t add many individual features. You just must simply go up in trim level if you want a fancier HR-V!

Continue reading below for even more about the 2020 Honda HR-V, which was carried over essentially unchanged from 2019 after receiving a major refresh!

Photos

Exterior

The exterior of the subcompact HR-V is sporty no matter which trim you opt for. But, the Sport and range-topping Touring trims offer the most style! They both feature unique honeycomb grilles and nicer wheels.

The Sport trim that SUVs.com test drove features 18” wheels with black inserts as standard. At a starting price of around $24,000 with added all-wheel drive, the Sport trim is a steal considering all the style you get with it!

If you opt for the range-topping Touring, you’ll get LED headlights. It also comes with a power moonroof, as do the EX and EX-L trims.

Interior

The interior of the Honda HR-V is surprisingly spacious! The subcompact SUV can fit five passengers comfortably. Plus, it’s highly versatile thanks to the second-row “Magic Seat.”

The “Magic Seat,” as Honda calls it, offers multiple ways to load cargo. It can fold flat for more traditional cargo space. Or, you can flip up the seat bottom so that you can store items from the floor to ceiling in the space directly behind the front seats. It’s helpful when loading taller or bulkier items like a lamp, chairs, or a small table. There’s over 58 cubic feet of cargo space, which is more than what many of the HR-V’s competitors offer.

You’ll want to upgrade to at least the Sport trim in order to get the larger 7” touchscreen and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto. The base LX trim does not get those perks. The HR-V Sport also features a leather-wrapped steering wheel with paddle shifters, which helps add to the feel of the interior.

Or, you might want to choose the trim that’s one level above the Sport! The mid-range EX trim gets even more comfort and safety features like heated front seats, the Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver assist technologies, and a one-touch power moonroof.

The range-topping Touring, meanwhile, has the most luxe features with navigation, leather-trimmed seats, and more.

A rearview camera comes standard on every HR-V. There are also dashboard lights that help add a futuristic feel to the cabin. The lights change colors based on vehicle warnings and for other reasons.

Performance

All Honda HR-V trims feature the same engine as standard. It comes with a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that makes 141 horsepower and 127 lb.-ft. of torque. It’s paired to a continuously variable transmission.

While a subcompact SUV like the HR-V doesn’t need a ton of power backing it up, the engine does feel a bit lackluster. If you want a sportier drive and more responsive acceleration, you might want to consider the Mazda CX-3.

With 7.3” of ground clearance and all-wheel drive optional on every trim (except for the Touring, where it comes standard), the HR-V is a reliable partner in all seasons! But, it’s certainly not a vehicle that you would want to take for any serious off-roading.

Although it also doesn’t have a ton of power backing it up, the HR-V remains fun to drive as it’s agile, nimble, and easy to maneuver. It might just be the perfect option for you if you live in a city and need to be able to get around with ease! Plus, all that versatile cargo space you get with the HR-V is helpful, especially if you have a furry friend.

You also get solid fuel economy figures with your HR-V. The Sport trim in AWD that SUVs.com test drove gets 31 mpg on the highway.

As for safety, there’s a multi-angle rearview camera that comes standard, as well as brake assist, vehicle stability assist with traction control, and plenty of airbags. You’ll want to upgrade to at least the EX trim, though, if you want the full Honda Sensing suite of safety and driver assisted technologies. It includes lane departure warning, forward collision warning, lane keeping assist, and more.

Pricing

The LX trim has an MSRP of $19,465 and includes a six speed manual transmission, 17in alloy wheels with all season tires, a multi-angle rearview camera, body-colored power side mirrors, LED brake lights, roof spoiler, cruise control, tilt and telescopic steering column, 2 12-volt power outlets, Bluetooth streaming audio, Bluetooth HandsFreeLink, auxiliary input jack, USB port, 5in LCD screen, and 4 speaker 160-watt audio system.

The CVT transmission is available for $800. An All Wheel Drive system is only available with the CVT for $2,100. Machine-finished 17in alloy wheels cost $1,300. Fog lights can be added for $341. The $21,515 EX trim adds auto on/off headlights, fog lights, heated body-colored power mirrors with indicators, smart entry security system, variable intermittent wipers, one-touch power moonroof with tilt feature, rear privacy glass, automatic climate with electrostatic touchscreen, push button start, illuminated vanity mirrors, Honda LaneWatch, heated front seats, dual USB ports, a 6 speaker 180-watt audio system, 7in display audio with high-resolution electrostatic touchscreen with customizable feature settings, HondaLink, Pandora compatibility, and SMS text function. The CVT transmission is available for $800.

An All Wheel Drive system is only available with the CVT for $2,100. Machine-finished 17in alloy wheels cost $1,300. The EX-L Navi trim provides a CVT transmission, Eco Assist system, roof rails, leather-wrapped steering wheel, leather-wrapped shift knob, auto-dimming rearview mirror, leather-trimmed seating, Honda Satellite-Linked Navigation System with Voice Recognition14 and Honda HD Digital Traffic, SiriusXM Radio, and HD radio. Machine-finished 17in alloy wheels cost $1,300. All Wheel Drive costs $1,300. Crossbars for the roof rails are an additional $449 A bike attachment for the roof rack can be added for $188.

Verdict

The Honda HR-V is a highly versatile and agile subcompact SUV. The Sport trim that SUVs.com test drove also has awesome exterior styling. The black honeycomb grille looks aggressive and the larger 18” wheels and sport side sills are a nice touch. SUVs.com is also a fan of the unique rear door handles and the dashboard lights which change color.

The engine isn’t as peppy as what you’ll find with some other subcompact SUV options like the Mazda CX-3, though. The HR-V also isn’t as rugged as the Subaru Crosstrek or Jeep Renegade.

But, with a budget-friendly starting price, a highly versatile interior with plenty of passenger and cargo space, and solid resale values, the HR-V might just have what you need!

The HR-V received an SUVs.com deal score of 76/100. Did you watch our review of the vehicle on YouTube? Be sure to leave us a comment on the video to let us know what you think of the subcompact Honda HR-V!

   Published by Elizabeth Jeneault on Feb 10, 2020  

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